Saturday, September 23, 2017

Guardian Amis Rub

It seems The Guardian (piece by Anne Enright) finds a lot to like about this new collection of essays from Martin Amis though apparently with some reservations. Of course, as you know, I'm an aficionado of Kingsley's son and will buy straightaway.

Lillian Ross

Ms. Ross was a legendary journalist with over 500 pieces published by The New Yorker. Don't click here or else you will go down the rabbit hole, like I did, of astounding talent.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Light In Darkness

A daily pitstop for me is Pat's Blog that is dedicated to all things mathematics. Today, he posted a  Konstantin Eduardovich Tsiolkovsky quote that in a current reality many have felt has gone mad is optimistic:
Mankind will not remain on the earth forever, but, in search of light and space, will at first timidly penetrate beyond the limits of the atmosphere and then finally conquer the spaces of the solar system.
Not a fan of math? Maybe my Movies + Math article can help make a minor dent in your life-long cynicism. Deal? ūüĎć

Wandering Spirit


John le Carré Interview

Just got around to watching the 60 Minutes interview with John le Carr√©. I've read his books since the 1980's when I first saw Alec Guinness play George Smiley in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and Smiley's People. Steve Kroft does a fine job of getting the famed author to reveal a little bit more about his past than I've seen in other such presentations. Worth your time if you appreciate his work or a writers creative process. Also, if you are a bit more intrigued with George Smiley, I've done a recap of his career at Macmillan's Criminal Element blog.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Rest In Peace, Stanislav Petrov

The man who stopped nuclear catastrophe in 1983 has passed away. If you are not aware of his history, I recommend clicking over to learn more about Mr. Petrov who deserves a monument in both Russia and the United States.

Concealed Carry, Alt-Right, And Hive Mind

Merriam Webster has expanded their essential dictionary with 250 new words. Here's the link to immerse yourself with the likes of froyo, Saigon Cinnamon, and my favorite... schneid. Oh, and I guess I was being a bit mischievous with the header to this post knowing it would bring in some traffic—but those have also been added. You don't feel cheated, right? Talking words is so much more enlightening.

Happy Birthday, Lexicographer

"Dull: Not exhilaterating (sic); not delightful; as, to make dictionaries is dull work." And Samuel Johnson would know. Happy 308th, sir.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Frank Bullitt Is The Name

This: ‘Bullitt’: A Suspense-Packed Thriller that Introduced a New Kind of Action Films. And hat tip to Andrew Nette for bringing this percipient article to my attention. Thought I knew most everything about this movie and realize I hardly had a clue.

Lonely As Hell

In a Lonely Place (1950) features one of the finest Humphrey Bogart performances equaled by the lovely Gloria Grahame as his doomed lover. And a very astute line, my favorite, comes when Bogart as a cynical Hollywood screenwriter named Dixon Steele says, "It was his story against mine, but of course, I told my story better." And another more tragic gem, "I was born when she kissed me. I died when she left me. I lived a few weeks while she loved me." How great is that, right?

Such poignant, flawless writing was adapted from the Dorothy B. Hughes novel of the same name. Considered by some to be the greatest noir, I disagree there, but it would easily be in the top five, with numero uno being Out of the Past. I watched Lonely Place earlier today and am thinking it needs to be part of my yearly rotation. A film of such immense, staggering depth is bound to elicit more treasures on repeated dives.

Worth The Wait? Dune (1984)

I have a sister that speaks well of the Dune books and even likes the 1984 movie though I know there are other fans who view this David Lynch science fiction extravaganza as a major misfire. So after 34 years, and a being a fan of both director Lynch and actor Kyle MacLachlan, I decided to take a look this early Sunday morning. Here's my ultra pithy, in the moment, thoughts:

Dune's special effects are dated so the movie has to survive on its narrative merits and though it's a bit long-winded it has tons of complex, interweaved story threads to maintain interest. As I said earlier on Twitter, it triumphed in me wanting to read the Herbert novels on which this production was based. Gripes: too many character inner voiceovers and though it's no fault of their own, I look at Patrick Stewart and think Captain Picard and Sting as that rock and roller with The Police. They are fine actors, that's just my visual hang-up, and you may not have such issues.

I would give Dune a non-committal 2 1/2 ✨ out of four. Far from a stinker like many have suggested but it just needed a little more wind in those sand infested sails.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Worth The Wait? Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure

No it wasn't. As a matter of fact I could barely finish this mirthless time traveling adventure. I recall Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure (1989) was stratosphere popular when I was 19. It seemed like everyone loved it and many of the silly catchphrases ("Bogus!") were in constant rotation. Maybe, I'm the wrong age for it now, perhaps, then again I don't think I would have enjoyed it any more back in the day. Huge fan of George Carlin and even those interludes seemed to lack focus and didn't register on the laugh-o-meter.

Next up, in movies I've missed until now, is David Lynch's Dune. Never read the book and have only seen a few parts of the movie. 

The Old Man and the Sea (1999)


Top hand-painted animation! From Alexander Petrov's adaptation of Hemingway's classic.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Motherhood & Creativity

The Atlantic: "How Motherhood Affects Creativity. Cultural messages tell women that making art and having children are incompatible pursuits. But..."

Best In Detective Fiction

Ross Macdonald, True Detective: The '50s noir novelist investigated sources of rot in the American grain.

Tweet, Tweet

I'm on Twitter and below is a few of my last tweets. I'm usually over there several times a day if you wish to connect beyond Blogger.

Heartening to follow Cassini's pioneering descent into Saturn—humans succeeding at something other than political squabbling, war. 

Co-worker retold my droll story, weeks later, as if it was his own. Harmless, but what stings, is the laugh-o-meter spiked on his version.

Finished book I'm reviewing and—bless the author—no "narrowed eyes" anywhere in 250 pages. Respite from that unrelenting, histrionic gaze!

Removing this etiolated mainframe of middle-aged bones away from the desk—off for a walk before rigor mortis develops.

I'm bringing back the word "devilry" that Merriam places in the low 30% of usage. Slipped into two colloquies in one week—no one blinked.

I try to remember every individual's totality is vast, complex, often with many tortured dead ends.

Read One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish (1960) to my daughter for the umpteenth time and not bored—what rhythm Seuss conjured.

Crossing the Rubicon with Julius Caesar, 49 BC, is on my time travel bucket list. Not the strongest swimmer, will bring an adult floatie.

Such an impulsive drive to write. If I don't—miserable.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Monday, September 11, 2017

Sammy

Sammy came into my life in 2000 and I brought him from Virginia to New York where he eventually lived with my mom and dad. When dad passed away in 2005, Sam was someone for my mom to take care of even though she wasn't a pet person. However, there was no doubt that six years later when they were separated a mutual bond had developed. Mom, in her eighties, had a hard time hearing Sam at the door ready to come in, so he would climb onto the roof to the side of mom's front door and leap down onto the air conditioner causing a loud enough din for her to go open the door and let him in. Also amusing, when it was getting dark and she was ready for him to come inside, she would call in a loud, vociferous shout, "SAM! SAM! HERE, SAM!" Like she was calling a person. It worked. And we all loved that chemistry.

My nephew Kyle took care of him next, though as with my mom, looking back, maybe it was Sammy taking care of him. Not a cat person either, he also fell to Sammy's charms. Once my sister Meta stopped by to see her son, looked through a window, and saw Sammy sleeping while wrapped around Kyle's neck as my nephew typed away on his computer. I treasure that image. For the last several years, my niece Kayla and her husband Kevin took extraordinary care of this kind soul and gave him tons of loving attention with all the comforts that I'm eternally grateful for. She called me today to say Sammy was on his way out. Though, seventeen years is a good, long time for a cat, I can't help feel profound sadness over this wonderful creature who made a difference in our lives.

Goodbye, and love you, old friend.

Five D's

Here are some words I have used in some recent or upcoming projects. All definitions are from Merriam Webster.

Deviltries is an archaic variant of devilry. Wickedness, mischief.  I said on Twitter earlier today: I'm bringing back the word "devilry" that Merriam places in the low 30% of usage. Slipped into two colloquies in one week—no one blinked.

Disport means sport, pastime. A recent Merriam Webster Word of the Day.

Discursive is digressing from subject to subject.

Dissolute. From the bottom 30% of deviltries to the top 30% with dissolute which means more or less lax morals.

Dragooned has become a quick favorite which means to coerce someone into doing something. Click on the link for another essential word of the day.

Friday, September 8, 2017

The Drone King: A Newly Discovered Kurt Vonnegut Short Story

The Atlantic has "The Drone King" by Kurt Vonnegut.

I'm Reading...

Valuing again, the inverted (at times discordant) panache of Times's Arrow by Martin Amis. In the top five of his best with Money, London Fields, The Information, and The Zone of Interest. And what is your current read?

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Despair

Conversations with Vladimir Nabokov collects 28 interviews with the author of Pale Fire, Lolita, etc. A must for me. And, in case you missed it, one of my most read articles was
Vladimir Nabokov’s Hidden Noir: Despair. You know me, always return to that noir thumping heart no matter the genre.

The Longest Word in the Dictionary - Merriam-Webster Ask the Editor (Not Antidisestablishmentarianism)

Blinders

That nettlesome sporadic occurrence filling in a number, in the daily sudoku, when that very number is present in the grid. Fleeting 'blindness' of sorts, occupational hazard.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

The Honorable Killer

Working like mad on the fifth novella (there was a fourth called Blood Moon not pictured above) in The Lawyer Western series. Following in the footsteps of Wayne and Eric is daunting but I'm feeling I got a fairly good handle on what I'm calling The Honorable Killer. For starters, much more backstory featuring J.D. Miller's (The Lawyer) past and how he came to be on his retribution trail. It is looking like an early 2018 release. Wish me luck! Back to the keyboard.

Happy 25th Anniversary! Top 10 Best Batman: The Animated Series Episodes

V'ger

I remember when Voyager I (and later 2) blasted off forty years ago today. As a kid the image of our technology leaving the galaxy was jaw-dropping to comprehend. Theoretical physicist, Lawrence M. Krauss has a splendid article touching on the historic event and what the future may hold for humanity and the Voyagers. By the way, any Star Trek fans? Whenever I think upon Voyager I, can't help recalling The Motion Picture (1979) and the Enterprise crew meeting up with our history.

Missing Pieces

Kudos to Matthew Olson for enumerating the logical (i.e., most beneficial) way to savor Twin Peaks. At this stage, I'm just interested in watching The Missing Pieces (2014) and reading "The Secret History of Twin Peaks" by Mark Frost (2016). And if you don't want to lose interest in Olson's approach, I recommend, after Laura's murderer is revealed just leapfrog to the last episode of season 2. That way you can avoid meandering narratives that really weigh down the overall enjoyment.  

Monday, September 4, 2017

Just A Little More Rhythm

I turned my final Twin Peaks article around in less than twelve hours which is a little too fast for my tastes–I like to polish for a few days to develop more rhythm. Still, if you are interested in my two-cents click over to Criminal Element, and, more importantly I'm interested in hearing from you.

Peaks has been a joy to watch, a bright spot in the fickle TV landscape. What next? I've heard Westworld is returning. Maybe I will hold out for that sci-fi Western. In the meantime, I will continue to play backgammon against Demon Seed. There's always backgammon.

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Reelin' In The Years

Chimera, Tulpa

I have written about Richard Burton at LitReactor and follow 'him' on Twitter. An entry from his August 19, 1980 diary: "Last night the audience was a phantom, now with you, now gone, a chimera of wrong responses." Merriam Webster defines: "1. a fire-breathing female monster with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail. 2. a thing that is hoped or wished for but in fact is illusory or impossible to achieve." (Note to self: It would be a shame to not make use of this word soon.)

In Twin Peaks: The Return, FBI Agent, Tammy Preston mentioned the word tulpa (I was not familiar) which is an imaginary thing made real through individual visualization or group conjuring. The show I'm recapping for Criminal Element makes good use of several tulpas and the conclusion of this subversive gem ends tonight. Going to hate like hell to see it go, in a sea of banal balderdash passing for entertainment, David Lynch brought progressive, thought-provoking film-making.

George Orwell: A Life in Pictures Full Documentary (High Quality)

Saturday, September 2, 2017

Noxious Is Harmful

Definition of noxious from Merriam Webster: "physically harmful or destructive to living beings noxious waste noxious fumes." Some of the synonyms of noxious: poisonous, toxic, deadly, harmful, dangerous, pernicious, damaging, and destructive.
Glad there's a reporter there in Crosby, Texas to question such an obvious divergent technique from this chemical company spokesman.

Friday, September 1, 2017

Smiley's Legacy

I've long been a fan of fictional master spy George Smiley ever since seeing Alec Guinness in the legendary Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley's People. Read all the books at least twice and have compiled a handy refresher course over at Macmillan's Criminal Element. The reason for my look back is that there's a new Smiley out this week by John le Carr√© called A Legacy of Spies. 

Thelonious Monk - Solo Monk (HD FULL ALBUM)

Saturday, August 26, 2017

Clear-Headed Act

“However great a man’s fear of life,” Doctor Magiot said, “suicide remains the courageous act, the clear-headed act of a mathematician. The suicide has judged by the laws of chance—so many odds against one that to live will be more miserable than to die. His sense of mathematics is greater than his sense of survival. But think how a sense of survival must clamour to be heard at the last moment, what excuses it must present of a totally unscientific nature.” Graham Greene's The Comedians (1966)

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Beach Essentials

We were at Colonial Beach, Virginia yesterday. These were my beach essentials.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Seven Words For David

I carry this blue notebook around, filling it up with words and definitions that I've never heard before or want to use in a story or article. Once the book is bursting with knowledge, I buy a new one. All definitions come from Merriam Webster except convivial that I found at Dictionary.

Arbitrage - the nearly simultaneous purchase and sale of securities or foreign exchange in different markets in order to profit from price discrepancies. First known use: 1875.

Rive - to wrench open or tear apart or to pieces. First known use: 14th century. Just used this palabra in my latest article at LitReactor.

En prise - of a chess piece; exposed to capture. First known use 1825.

Triumphalism - an attitude or feeling of victory or superiority. First known use 1964.

Convivial - friendly; agreeable. First known use 1660-1670.

Abrogate - to abolish by authoritative action. First known use circa 1520.

Specious - having deceptive attraction or allure; having a false look of truth or genuineness. First known use: 1513.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

I May Get Some Flak...



I may get some flak for this one but its an issue that has been needling me for a while:
Book vs. Television: What TV's Sheriff Longmire Is Doing Wrong article is live at LitReactor.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Don't Try This At The Gas Station

Man fueling his car on the other side of the pump climbed back inside his vehicle and began to text. He finished what he was writing and forgot what he was doing there in the first place and pulled away ripping the hose clean off the pump. He jumped out, startled, asking me, "should I tell somebody?" I looked at him with narrowed eyes (yes, those narrowed eyes) and said, "yeah, good idea." Darndest thing.

Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Transgemination

I had such a kick working with Glenn on Transgemination. The kind of book still giving me chuckles on the third pass. Science fiction, horror, thrills, and lots of humor. It is now available in print and for the kindle. Here's what its all about:
What would YOU do if you stumbled upon a mysterious simmering gooey thing in your backyard? Farm boys Karl and Stew are forced to answer this question when they happen upon an otherworldly blob thing in their cornfield. Before they know it, their normally tranquil farm is transformed into a chaotic, surreal nightmare of sorts, and quickly becomes the epicenter of national attention. Follow Karl and Stew as they struggle to maintain their sanity in this humorous, sometimes outlandish but thought provoking sci-fi novella, replete with bizarre creatures, explosions and even a love story. A must read for fans of retro sci-fi/horror B movies, woven with real science, as only Glenn Gray can do. Buckle up for a fun, yet harrowing ride.

Sunday, August 6, 2017

Robert Mitchum at 100

Mitch would have turned 100 today. I've written three articles for Criminal Element celebrating the actor's centennial. In the first, I take a look at his Westerns. A sample:

Innovative Western artfully directed by Raoul Walsh that noir historian Jake Hinkson (The Big Ugly, The Posthumous Man) calls, “… one of the premier examples of Neurosis In The West.” Controversial topics like repressed memory, hallucinations, and a passing hint of incest are broached in this cutting-edge production. 
Both Montgomery Cliff and Kirk Douglas were considered and rejected for the role. Mitchum, known as “the soul of film noir” for classics like Out of the Past (1947), took the dark, tortured outsider and easily adapted it to the Old West while hardly missing his fedora and trench coat.

Damn Good Coffee

I'm enjoying a "damn good" cup of coffee (bypassing usual morning tea) as I prepare tomorrow's Twin Peaks 11-13 episode recap for Criminal Element. Check here for my last write up on the offbeat, subversive revival.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Making Old New

Scene: a few days ago at a hotel in Virginia. Me: ridiculously happy contemplating how to best preserve this forty-year-old backgammon board my sister Sharon gave to me. It's in rather good condition though needs some glue in a few spots where the felt is coming undone but what should I use for the latches that are rusty and worn with age?

Tuesday, August 1, 2017

The End Has Arrived

After ten months of journeying toward The Dark Tower, I have reached the pinnacle with a small but loyal ka-tet. I originally started my read of King's magnum opus in the 1980's, broke off for a couple of decades, and have now finished it. Here's my last dispatch from on top and what we found behind that final door. Spoilers, my friends, spoilers.

Monday, July 31, 2017

The Passing of Sam Shepard

Sorry to hear that Sam Shepard has died. Many top films in a stellar career but one that I immediately think of is Blackthorn from 2011. I reviewed it in my Under Burning Skies: Best of 21st Western Movies article.

Rest in peace, sir.

An Uneasy Evening

A great memory from Eddie Muller: An Uneasy Evening with the Noir Legend.

Richard's Storyville

I enjoy reading whatever Richard Thomas writes including his recent column at LitReactor: Storyville: Adding Diversity to Your Fiction.

Whole Lotta Writers

Open Culture brought this to my attention: 1,500 hours of audio & video featuring 2,200 writers.

Morning Read: Microsoft Is Hustling Us With...

Microsoft Is Hustling Us With "White Spaces" by Susan Crawford.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

My Influences... And Yours?

I'm back at LitReactor with a new article. Please share, stop by there/leave a comment, write home to mom, etc. Here's a sample:
Like many writers, I was reared on a never-ending veneration for big guns such as Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf. Authors who’ve passed some ‘immortal’ litmus test for stuffy academic types to get overly excited about. Harsh? Perhaps, because most of the top tier lit club have deservedly earned their marks. But along the path I’ve learned some of the best prose originates from sources other than these writing titans. Here are two actors—who apparently fancied putting pen to paper over starring roles—and one journalist that I would stack up with the best of the best and have returned to often for inspiration.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Royal Excursions

We stopped at the charming Royal Oak Bookshop where I picked up the eclectic trio of Visiting Mrs. Nabokov (1993) by Martin Amis, The Backgammon Book (1970) by Oswald Jacoby and John R. Crawford, and a math book on Algebra. We also went to a nearby park where we enjoyed about an hour until the sun heated things up a little too much. Still, a fun excursion.
Royal Oak Bookshop in Front Royal, Virginia.

Bookstore's Simone making Ava feel welcomed.

At a nearby park heading off for other worlds.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Interrogation

I'm publishing Glenn Gray's next book Transgemination and he talks about that and a lot more in this interview with S.W. Lauden.

Monday, July 17, 2017

Subversive, Expressionistic, and Harrowing


“Gotta Light” is a subversive, expressionistic, and harrowing episode with prolonged scenes—even by Lynch standards—of no dialogue. “As soon as you put things in words, no one ever sees the film the same way,” he was quoted as saying in The New Yorker. The sobering result: we hear the eerie, discordant “Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima” by Penderecki as we bear witness to the first atomic bomb test at White Sands, New Mexico, on July 16, 1945, and are pulled into the mushroom cloud among the swirling atoms of hellfire and destruction.

Sunday, July 16, 2017

13 Is Who's Lucky Number

I'm not familiar with her work but have heard that Jodi Whittaker is a fine actor. I'm looking forward to her portrayal but more importantly a fresh direction to the series that I thought had become very stale last year. If you haven't already seen it, here's the big reveal that sent shock waves through the universe. Your thoughts? And not long ago, I rated my Time Lords in this order:

Matt Smith
Tom Baker
David Tennant
Patrick Troughton
Jon Pertwee
Peter Davison
Christopher Eccleston
Paul McGann
Peter Capaldi
William Hartnell
Sylvester McCoy
Colin Baker

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Our Visit To Luray Caverns

Drapery formation, about 1/8 inch thick.

Dream Lake.

Water reflection of stalactites.

Speleothems of stalactites, and columns.

The wishing well.

Did You Hear The One About...

I have a dry sense of humor and in conversation can be witty if “I’m on” but note to self: no more joke telling. For god’s sake, just stop! Yesterday a humorous number died a painful death as soon as it left my lips, and the drive-by expression on the recipient’s face, well, it’s a look I’ve never got used to seeing. Now that I’m closing in on the half-century mark, it’s time to throw in the towel and just accept the fact that I should never begin any conversation with the words, “Hey, did you hear the one about …”

Sunday, July 9, 2017

Cranmers At The Park

Our daughter snapped this photo of little d and me at the park, today, playing backgammon. We were under the pavilion where a nice breeze kept us comfortable ... a pleasant break from the ninety degree temps with humidity. I brought two books to read, The Dark Tower and Orwell's Facing Unpleasant Facts, but much more enjoyed gammon with the mrs and going for a walk with the photographer.

Hope you are all having a top weekend.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Books Acquired, Manners Lost

We were at McKay’s in Gainesville, Virginia, enjoying the atmosphere among the stacks of secondhand books with a swirl of all sorts of people devouring a common passion. Ava and d headed toward the kid’s section where they hit a motherlode of ‘Junie B. Jones’ which has totally enamored our daughter. Me, being in an essay and memoir frame of mind, I bought Roger Ebert’s Life Itself, E.L. Doctorow’s Creationists, Sloane Crosley’s How Did You Get This Number, and Facing Unpleasant Facts by George Orwell. I read so many fictional books as a freelancer that I find myself more and more in the non-fiction section for entertainment.

Small observation: it used to be when someone passed in front of you in an aisle there would be a polite, “Excuse me.” That was the norm … or at least it’s how I seem to remember it. Look, I’m not someone who longs for the good old days. I know people are people and remain largely unchanged, but I don’t believe I’m mistaken that common courtesies in libraries and bookstores were the standard and only occasionally would someone fail to live up to it. Agree? Disagree?

Friday, July 7, 2017

Love you, d

And a happy anniversary to this lovely lady. We are celebrating ten years. Love you, d

Thursday, July 6, 2017

Hooch

Met a truck driver today, in passing, who travels with a one-year-old conure parrot. The bird, Hooch, sat in a cage next to the driver, Turner, in the cab. No need to feel sorry for Hooch being in a cage though, the clever bird knows how to open the door any time he pleases, as he much prefers being perched on Turner’s shoulder. When Turner gave Hooch a playful toss in the air, the bird flew up then landed on my shoulder! And Hooch kept saying “aye,” Turner explained that the bird’s way of telling him that he wants food. These two are good friends and meeting them was a unique, inspiring experience. 

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

72 (This Highway's Mean)

Becoming Cary Grant

Do you enjoy documentaries? I do and can watch just about anything on any topic as long as it is done well. In the case of Becoming Cary Grant (2016), I very much admire the subject and director Mark Kidel has crafted an evocative film that uses Grant's home movies, interviews with relatives, and words from an unpublished autobiography. The Showtime presentation is currently available on Amazon Prime and here's a NY Times review that sums it up quite well.

Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Low-Key Fun

Is everyone having a super 4th? I hope so because the Cranmer's are kicking it albeit a bit low-key... the way we like it. We went to two different parks for the little one and had a blast at the swimming pool too. I brought along a book—Thomas Paine: A Political Life—and manage to squeeze out a backgammon win against Little d. Very satisfying because she puts up a mighty fight. And now for some fireworks!

*You on Twitter? Today is a perfect day to follow The Quotable Paine that I contribute to almost daily. Radical Paine's Common Sense (1775-1776) is the pamphlet that convinced the rebels to start this whole American experiment.

Monday, July 3, 2017

Where The Breakers Are

I am putting together my next write-up on Stephen King's THE DARK TOWER VII that will appear on Macmillan's Criminal Element blog around noon tomorrow. For the most part a solid section that includes our heroes preparing their next move.
"We go through the door to Thunderclap station," Roland said, "and from the station to where the Breakers are kept. And there ..." He looked at each of his ka-tet in turn, then raised his finger and made a dryly expressive shooting gesture.
"There'll be guards," Eddie said. "Maybe a lot of them. What if we're outnumbered?"
"It won't be the first time," Roland said.
Our passages for the week included Part Two, I: The Devar-Tete – VII: Ka-Shume and I hope you will join us to discuss or just stop by and listen to our palaver. A lot transpired including the return of Randall Flagg, Mordred Deschain hunting Roland and company, and our team wandering through the eerie chamber where the now quieted remains of the wolves of the Calla are suspended. 

And the Tower looms...

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Gram Parsons - Return Of The Grievous Angel

Immutable And Ineluctable

Richard Burton. Say the name and Elizabeth Taylor jumps to mind. But there was so much more to the man besides Liz & Dick, scandal, and great acting chops that were highlighted in movies like The Spy Who Came in from The Cold, Where Eagles Dare, and 1984. He was a damn fine writer and he's included in an upcoming article I'm putting together over this holiday weekend. Here's an except from his life-long journal that was published in 2012:
The more I read about man and his maniacal ruthlessness and his murdering envious scatological soul the more I realize that he will never change. Our stupidity is immortal, nothing will change it. The same mistakes, the same prejudices, the same injustice, the same lusts wheel endlessly around the parade-ground of the centuries. Immutable and ineluctable. I wish I could believe in a God of some kind but I simply cannot. My intelligence is too muscular and my imagination stops at the horizon, and I have an idea that the last sound to be heard on this lovely planet will be a man screaming.
How sobering is that, right? And there's many more entries like that in The Richard Burton Diaries. And the dead live again, Richard's words are featured daily on Twitter which I regularly check. Burton ... fascinating guy. Back to work I go on a piece I'm calling My Unlikely Writing Influences.

The Doctor Falls

I haven’t remarked too much on Doctor Who this season because I thought it was a lackluster ride. The actors were ready but the scripts, for the most part (besides a stout debut), were meandering, lifeless. Not so with the climatic “The Doctor Falls” that had plenty of action, heartfelt emotion, and one helluva final surprise that I won’t spoil here. Most poignant scene was a solo Twelve (Peter Capaldi) preparing to do battle with an outnumbered enemy (anyone for an upgrade?) saying that he goes, “Without hope… Without witness… Without reward.” Refreshing in this age when humanity seems to be all about winning as opposed to doing the right thing. Mention is, appropriately, made to the leader of the free world.

It would seem we have said goodbye to Bill (Pearl Mackie) for the time being. I thought she was excellent but like the idea of companions with shorter duration's. That being acknowledged, I don’t want to see Nardole (Matt Lucas) disappear just yet. He was a superb foil for Twelve with just the right amount of snarky wit. Back to that conclusion. Wouldn’t it be awesome if that older gentleman ended up being a companion to Twelve in the Christmas episode and for a few episodes into the next season. Yeah, here’s hoping.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Ada

At a used bookstore today, I ran across The Calculating Passion of Ada Byron by Joan Baum. Long been enthralled with Ada (1815-1852) known as the first computer programmer. Here's an excerpt from the book:
She had also dared to dream, to imagine what computers might do with their power to repeat and loop and change course in midstream. And she had exercised her imagination when time and place were against her, when women were excluded from the halls of learning and generally dissuaded from pursuing subjects like mathematics, even in the drawing rooms.
Never heard of Ada? Here's a fun, short documentary, narrated by Hannah Fry, that spotlights this remarkable 19th century mathematician.

In 1977, When Voyager 1 And 2 Blasted Off, I was...

I was seven years old, in '77, and fascinated with the space program especially the Voyager missions. Of particular interest to that early me was the gold-plated audio-visual disc on both Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 that contained the sights and sounds of our world intended for intelligent life. From The Atlantic is a fascinating article about one reporter's attempt at Solving the Mystery of Whose Laughter Is On the Golden Record.

Friday, June 30, 2017

The June That Was

I'm hoping you all had a great month of June, I did. Our daughter graduated from kindergarten which, as you can imagine, was the highlight. She loves school and told us today she can't wait until summer vacation is over to go backfingers crossed that attitude stays through 12th grade, right?

Beyond that I released Nik Morton's Continuity Girl through BEAT to a PULP books and published a final short story from the late William E. Wallace. Also, I continued to work on a Thomas Paine project (I help run The Quotable Paine on Twitter) and am nearing completion on Glenn Gray's Transgemination. That novella is "a must read for fans of retro sci-fi/horror B movies, woven with real science, as only Glenn Gray can do.

I expanded my reach as a freelance writer with an article appearing at LitReactor. As I've mentioned before this is a big deal for me because I've respected the top tier quality that appears there, especially the work of Keith Rawson.

Okay, on to July ...

Duolingo's New Approach To A Difficult Language

I may look into this: Duolingo invented a new way to teach one of the most difficult languages to learn.

Haruki Murakami: Hardboiled, Surreal, and Bewitching

My article: Hardboiled, Surreal, and Bewitching: 3 Haruki Murakami Short Stories

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

The Tower Looms

We begin our reread of The Dark Tower VII at Criminal Element. An excerpt:
The Dark Tower is very close, but our ka-tet is spread far and wide. Roland and Eddie are in 1977 where they have just finished meeting with the author Stephen King. In 1999, Father Callahan and Jake are about to storm The Dixie Pig lounge where Susannah is being held along with Mia, who is about to give birth to an unholy demon: this child has the DNA combo of Roland and Susannah and a “co-father” in the Crimson King. So, we are very close to our destination, the stakes are high, and it’s anybody’s guess who will live to see The Dark Tower. 
The Dark Tower looms on the horizon for both our ka-tet and you, our loyal readers, as we count down the days to the premiere of The Dark Tower film. The plan is to finish the series on the Tuesday before the premiere, so we'll be splitting The Dark Tower into four sections (about 200 pages each) and meeting here at our usual time (Tuesday at 12 p.m. ET) to discuss major themes, motifs, and reactions.

Subliminal Advertising

Book Cover Has Some Extremely Clever Subliminal Advertising.

Eight Writers On Why They Run

Peter Hessler, Joyce Carol Oates, Malcolm Gladwell, and others weigh in about finding inspiration on the trails.

I Before E Except After C: Uh, Maybe Not

Nathan Cunningham: i before e except after...w? 

Thursday, June 22, 2017

My New Gig

I'm very pleased to say my first article for LitReactor is now live. Big deal for me because I've admired the high quality output that is their standard. Please take a look when you get a chance.

Monday, June 19, 2017

No Sizzle, Just Fizzle

The acting throughout this show has been one triumph after another, with special mentions going to Kristin Chenoweth, who was a bright spot, along with Emily Browning, who was a standout through the season. It pains me to say this because I’ve always enjoyed Gillian Anderson’s roles, but Media has been a bit of a letdown, especially the breathy impersonations of starlets—there’s no sizzle, just fizzle. 

More of my article here.

Saturday, June 10, 2017

Closing Time

Those who knew William E. Wallace, knew he was a straight-shooting, no bullshit kind of man. That honesty pervaded his fiction writing where he composed gripping, hardboiled perfection. I had the honor of publishing a short story called "Fundamental Breach" for BEAT to a PULP and was jazzed when he said he had another for me though I knew I wouldn't be able to publish until this year. I'll never forget what he wrote back, "I will send it to you. Let me know if it works. I probably won't be around anymore in 2017, but I would love to have something appear out of nowhere after I am gone -- "ghost" written, so to speak. . ."
That matter-of-fact bluntness tore me up to read. I wish I could have worked with him more but I feel fortunate for the times I did. He had such a driven spirit, continuing to spin stories and play slide guitar right up to the end. Sir, thank you, for not just your incredible output as a writer but for being a damn fine human being that I called friend. 
And, here's one more from William E. Wallace … "Closing Time."

Nik Morton's Continuity

Nik Morton talking about BEAT to a PULP's next release Continuity Girl can be found here.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

From Westlake with Love

Once again, I'm talking 007:
The James Bond I prefer, the “real” James Bond, is the one that exists outside of the bloated, by-the-numbers films. The highly profitable franchise produced few faithful adaptations, the genuine articles being Dr. No (1962), From Russia with Love (1963), the loyal-in-gritty-spirit For Your Eyes Only(1981), and Casino Royale (2006). Otherwise, cinema JB is a cartoonish, pale comparison to the Bond that I highlighted in “The Gadgetless and Tired Assassin.”

That’s the 007 who has the feel of a tired public servant who's one martini away from turning his gun on himself or drinking himself into an oblivion. Not a handsome man—he has a visible scar on his face—but undeniably charismatic. He’s particularly ruthless, as in “The Hildebrand Rarity” (1960) where he covers up a murder by dumping a body overboard. There’s no bullshitting that the secret agent has a license to kill, and he takes the opportunity to use it if need be.

For the rest, click here to read From Westlake with Love: Exploring Donald Westlake's Lost Bond Novel, Forever and a Death.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Dean at 100

I take a look at Dean Martin's Westerns on what would have been his 100th birthday.

Song of Susannah Part II

The Dark Tower: Song of Susannah is zipping right along and I certainly appreciate all of you clicking over and upping the web traffic. Keeps me gainfully employed.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

The Most Interesting Man in the World

I enjoyed this human interest article on The Most Interesting Man in the World. You may remember he was the spokesman for Dos Equis beer for a number of years. Sample:
During the course of his career, he worked with Burt Lancaster and John Wayne, Shelley Winters and Joan Fontaine; caroused with playwrights Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller; crossed egos with Dustin Hoffman; painted houses with Nicholas Colasanto (the guy who played Coach on Cheers); slept with a bevy of starlets, including Tina Louise, who played the hot marooned actress on Gilligan’s Island, and “six vegetarians, nine Buddhists, 18 nurses, six teachers, countless receptionists and one runner-up to Miss Florida.”
And full article here.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Across the Rio Grande

I feel AMERICAN GODS is blowing it. The Coming to America segments have been my personal favorites thus far in the first season of GODS, so much so that they often steal the show. But what a disappointment this week’s opening turned out to be.

Maybe it was the slow-mo action scene that lacked any palpable tension as a group of immigrants crossed the Rio Grande. Beforehand, there was a bit of praying, a quick shot of hand holding, and some grave instructions but little else. When one man who can’t swim begins to drown, Jesus is already there to lift him up, and then we see Christ walk across the water.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Magic!

I've always enjoyed magic and use to practice quite a bit so I understood the beginning of this magicians act... and then he blows me away with the rest. Incredible.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Getting Rid of Ticks

We have begun using a natural product called Cedarcide to keep the ticks away and its been working. The tiny terrorists loathe the cedar oil and we haven't had a case (knock on wood) in several weeks. I also spray the yard to combat the ongoing invasion. If you are in an area where ticks are prevalent, I recommend this product.

Monday, May 29, 2017

Lemon Scented

Without exception, the opening vignettes to American Gods are mini-masterpieces destined to be viewed time and again as inquiring minds seek to know more about these nearly forgotten fables—expect lots of YouTube hits.

In a compelling animated segment, the very first god comes to America circa 14,000 BC. A tribe of people crosses the land bridge from Siberia, following the wooly mammoths in hopes of finding food for their starving people. Atsula and her clan carry an effigy of their god, Nunyunnini, while they make the treacherous journey across the frozen, barren landscape. Her baby dies along the way, and when they finally arrive in the new land, she becomes the ultimate sacrifice to a bison-like spirit so her people can live—only to confront a tribe that had come before them. They defeat the newly encountered rivals and take their food, and then they leave behind Nunyunnini to be forgotten over time. The scene, like other Coming to America sections, was in variance from the novel.

Ay, dios mio!

If there was one thing that stood out in this week’s episodes, it was those regurgitation scenes. Ay, dios mio! More than once as Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) is passing from the Black Lodge back to the land of the living.

In what can only be described as a surreal trip for Coop, he gets sucked through an electrical outlet and rides the current until he switches bodies with a lookalike named Dougie Jones. The hapless Dougie was enjoying the company of a lady of the evening, Jade (Nafeesa Williams), who is washing up when Coop arrives and takes Dougie’s place. And there begins possibly the vilest puke scene ever delivered on camera (and if you can point to more disgusting exhibits, I’ll just take your word for it). Dougie is swept away to the Black Lodge, where the one-armed man, Gerard (Al Strobel), explains, “Someone manufactured you,” and bears witness as the doppelg√§nger disintegrates into nothing more than a little round ball.

Hope you click over here for my review of episodes 3 and 4 of Twin Peaks: The Return. 

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

CONTINUITY GIRL

The latest release from BEAT to a PULP and Nik Morton is now available for kindle pre-order. Print to follow.

What has gone before . . .

In our future, Kyler Knightly and his uncle Damon Cole are field agents for Continuity Inc, a private organization that obtained the contract when the government Time Corps was deregulated. CI is dedicated to protecting human history.

They use the Zygma projector to travel through time and must carry a focus object from the period they’re targeting.

Kyler is also a dreamer with passive psychic talents, a precognitive.

The head of the group is an Artificial Intelligence character, Sennacherib, which possesses an organic interface, sharing the body of a two-spot octopus in an aquarium tank! Their offices are in the West End of London, a disused theater.

The third book in the series brings two more exciting time-travel adventures for Knightly and Cole of Continuity Inc.

CONTINUITY GIRL


Kyler is accompanied by the delectable yet mysterious Tertia Beynon. Their mission is to trace an academic who has traveled to Roman Britain in 192 AD. Precog suggests that an interfering event in this past will radically alter the future. Arriving at Hadrian’s Wall in the freezing winter, the pair encounter blood-thirsty argumentative locals and then obtain the aid of Governor Clodius Albinus in their trek on the northern side of the wall. Here they are confronted by Ambrosius, a druid who possesses arcane power.

Nothing seems simple. Action abounds, with brutal sacrifices, deadly swordplay, a fraught chariot chase and an attack by a pack of wolves.

With all this going on, will they be able to save their future in time?

“What an exciting zip back to the past with some really neat time travel twists! The story may be short but it’s packed with plenty of entertaining ‘what ifs’ and action near Hadrian’s Wall. And for good measure, the conclusion just might be something you don’t expect!” —Nancy Jardine, author of 'The Celtic Fervour' series

WE FELL BELOW THE EARTH

Our duo are helped by Tertia and Chief Inspector Irving. Corpses drained of blood point to a clue, a letter from Bistritz in 1897. Kyler and Cole are sent to Transylvania.

The conclusions are inescapable: it seems that the discovery of time travel—even though it’s regulated and Continuity Inc strives to protect history—heralded in a sequence of parallel time-streams. Where before these time-streams were ‘what if’ scenarios, now they’ve split into different realities. In some, fiction is fact.

The deaths, the blood and gore point to vampires being real, and they’re certainly not your idealized romantic sort. The evil blood-suckers are intent on feasting in Kyler’s present and spreading their contagion ...

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Git Gone

I found the first few episodes of American Gods lacking but the show finally hit its stride with number four, "Git Gone." Below is a sample of what I wrote for Macmillan's Criminal Element blog. Go ahead and click over for the remainder of my two 1/2 cents:

There's a real slow turning of the narrative page here (yet when slow is done right, it can be exciting, √† la Twin Peaks) that wasn't clicking in the first three episodes, and the compartmentalization of the book that kept the reader enthralled just didn’t have the same effect in the show. For someone who likes it when filmmakers stay true to the book, I have to admit that I’m glad they expanded the Laura Moon character in “Git Gone.” It provides a much-needed backstory to her relationship with Shadow, and it made this episode the first exceptional one of the series.

Monday, May 22, 2017

CHROMATICS "SHADOW"

Twin Peaks: The Return

Ahead of David Lynch’s revival, I went back and binged on the original series, interested to know if it would still capture me like it did 27 years ago. I was only a few years older than the fictional 17-year-old Laura Palmer when I sat with my mom and best friend Erik each week, religiously invested in Special Agent Cooper probing Laura’s grisly death. My mother didn’t laugh at the dark humor that Erik and I enjoyed over the slain girl’s mom wailing long past when other directors would have yelled “cut!” We had grown up on Lynch’s Blue Velvet and were more than prepared for the dramatic swings—after all, Dennis Hopper snuffing up oxygen through a mask is practically normal. Still, both generations were glued-fast to the intrigue.
My full review is at Criminal Element.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Do Some Damage: Writing, Self-Promotion, and Real Life

Do Some Damage: Writing, Self-Promotion, and Real Life: By Court Merrigan , Guest Post I haven't updated my blog since December 15, 2014, and it's been a lot longer than that since I...

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Q&A with Court Merrigan

After many months of work (and obviously much longer for Court), we finally get to enjoy the release of THE BROKEN COUNTRY—just out today. Not sure what it is about? Then click over to this interview we did for Criminal Element.

At Outpost 16

Jake is feeling unsettled about spying on Ben Slightman The Elder and Andy while they’re conversing in private. After Ben Slightman the Younger falls asleep, Jake slips away with Oy—sniffing like a bloodhound—to follow their trail to a seemingly abandoned building. It’s labeled Outpost 16, which Jake assumes was erected by the Old Ones. There, he finds more North Central Positronics, LTD signs and tech. On the door itself: WELCOME TO THE DOGAN. Uh-oh. Here we go, as they say.

Inside, fluorescent lights snap to life, revealing skeletons in tattered brown uniforms—soldiers of sorts who’ve long since given a damn about what they were guarding. More shocking than the gruesome remains are the 31 screens monitoring various locations in the region, including Calla high street, Our Lady of Serenity Church, and Took’s General Store.
Rest of my reread of Wolves of the Calla can be found at Criminal Element.

The Broken Country

Our latest BEAT to a PULP release is a partnership with the talented Court Merrigan with one very looong title. You ready? Ok, here it goes: The Broken Country: Being the Scabrous Exploits of Cyrus & Galina Van, Hellbent West During the Eighth Year of the Harrows, 1876; With an Account of Mappers, Bounty Hunters, a Tatar, and the Science of Phrenology.

Set in post-apocalyptic 1876, The Broken Country tracks the scabrous exploits of the outlaws Cyrus and Galina Van. The pair kidnaps a na√Įve, young scion and head west in pursuit of gold, glory, and respect. Along the trail they met Atlante Ames, a mapper who euthanized her own father and now seeks her twin brother, himself gone outlaw in the ravaged West. In cold pursuit rides the implacable bounty hunter Hal, who takes scalps in the name of Jesus Christ and the science of phrenology, and the contemplative Buddhist assassin Qa'un, paying off the bloodprice he owes Hal … bounty by bloody bounty. Cyrus and Galina's hard road west comes to a head in a dynamite-tossing, six-gun-blazing shootout at the old train depot in Laramie.

A dark journey to a time when wagon trains have retreated and the Old West is haunted by bonepickers and starving tribes, The Broken Country is unlike any other book you will read this year. And we have never written a truer statement than that last sentence. Here's the Amazon link to buy either print or ebook.

Sunday, May 14, 2017

The Outlaw Marshal is Returning

Nik Morton discusses writing about someone else's series character. That someone else is me and I couldn't be happier when Nik breathes continuing life into Cash Laramie.

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Lilac

I've mentioned planting a lilac and d and I managed to get the tree (some call them shrubs) in the ground yesterday. Not the exact right time for lilacs but we will nurse her carefully.