Thursday, December 22, 2016

Django (1966)

A classic that still kicks ass half a century later and still inspiring tributes like Quentin Tarentino's Django Unchained (2012) though all pale in comparison to this spaghetti Western that was itself a remake of Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo (1961). Franco Nero is Django who is first seen dragging a coffin near the muddy Mexico and United States border. After rescuing the beautiful Maria (Loredana Nusciak) from being crucified on a burning cross, he goes to a nearby ghost town and makes a saloon his base of operation. Django then for reasons, at first, that's only known to him wages a one-man war against two local warring factions led by Major Jackson’s klansmen and General Hugo Rodríguez’s revolutionaries. He seems to be setting himself up against insurmountable odds but no worries, pilgrims, all the help he will need is in that coffin.

11 comments:

Garnett Elliott said...

Why is it that watching "Spaghetti's" for me feels like a wholly different experience than your "standard" western? It's like it's a different genre or something . . .

Has anyone ever written a "Spaghetti" western-style novel?

Charles Gramlich said...

I've seen most of it but I'm not sure I've ever watched the whole thing. Garnett, did you know that Joe Millard wrote some novelizations of the Man with No Name movies and also wrote a few original stories using that character.

oscar case said...

I think I (we, the foreign troops) was being kicked out of France by DeGaulle when this came out so I never got wind of it. I like Spaghetti westerns, though.

Garnett Elliott said...

Charles: I did not know that about Joe Millard, but I am now going to be hunting Amazon to track down those novelizations. Thanks!

(BTW, when you get the chance, I'd like to get your take on the new Conan rpg)

David Cranmer said...

Garnett/Charles, I will seek out the Millard novels. That's news to me and betting that I would enjoy. And, Garnett, I'm with you that it's like walking into a whole new genre with only a few leftover trappings.

One of the best, Oscar.

Elgin Bleecker said...

David – I’ve seen several films directed by Sergio Corbucci, but not this one. This Sergio ranks just a notch below “the” Sergio – Leone.

David Cranmer said...

Elgin, I need to see more Corbucci films. A true maestro of the form.

Elgin Bleecker said...

David – Have you seen Corbucci’s THE GREAT SILENCE? I will bet that is where Tarantino got the idea for his winter western, THE HATEFUL EIGHT.

David Cranmer said...

Yes! THE GREAT SILENCE is one of the greatest films hands down and definitely a Tarantino influence.

Prashant C. Trikannad said...

David, this is the only Sergio Corbucci film I have seen, not once but several times. I like DJANGO for sheer absurdity and well-crafted entertainment. I'd like to see THE GREAT SILENCE.

David Cranmer said...

THE GREAT SILENCE is epic. A milestone in the genre.