Friday, March 22, 2013

The Reading Habits Of A Tired Traveler

I’m pooped. I’ve been in, like, twelve states in two weeks. Published one book during that time and working on publishing three others. Not complaining, just letting you know the reason I haven’t made my usual round of the blogs. We’re trekking again this weekend, and I hope to play catch up when we get to our destination. Many of you know I read several books at the same time. Odd, but that’s me. (And, hey, I still knock on wood religiously and carry a bottle of holy water just in case.)

During my travels—and whenever I can steal some time—these are a few that I’m reading. ALL THE WILD CHILDREN by Josh Stallings. Because I just bought this book, it’d normally be farther down on my TBR list, but the opening chapter hooked me good. An interesting life well-told. HOME INVASION by good friend, Patti Abbott. Do I need to say more? This novel in stories has all the dramatic power you would expect from one of the finest short story writers of our time.

I’ve been on a kick of recent reading letters written by various writers, most recently Charles Bukowski’s SCREAMS FROM THE BALCONY: SELECTED LETTERS 1960-1970 and Hunter S. Thompson’s FEAR AND LOATHING IN AMERICA (GONZO LETTERS).

Rounding out the list is THE KILLER IS DYING by James Sallis. I started reading this one a year back, but circumstances with day job distracted me, and the book ended up in storage. I was rummaging through boxes this week when I rediscovered it, and I’m savoring this fresh, unique novel.

So that and several ARCs—for blurbs I’m working on—is what I’m reading. What’s on your nightstand?

14 comments:

Dyer Wilk said...

I have a stack of books on my nightstand. But the one that's been doing it for me lately is Ray Bradbury's "The October Country." The stories remind me why I started writing in the first place.

David Cranmer said...

Bradbury makes me forget I'm reading a book or collection of short stories. One of a handful of writers who can transport me somewhere else. Gifted magic.

G. B. Miller said...

I've done a rash of non-fiction in the past few weeks (non-fiction is what I read for pleasure) and for the moment, I've hit the proverbial wall.

So, I got a book from newbie romance author Cyndi Harris called "Heart of a Stripper" that I promised to review.

You can now officially start mocking me for reading romance novels.

Randy Johnson said...

Patti's book is in the queue as soon as I get a few review obligations out of the way. THE JERICHO DECEPTION by Jeffrey Small, an ARC, is the paper book I'm also reading.

Chris said...

I've got two or three going right now myself, but the one closest to hand at the moment is one my wife's been on my case to read for a couple years called The Book of Evidence by John Banville.

I recently just finished The Heroes by Joe Abercrombie, the first big, thick fantasy I've read in years. I loved it so much it's left me in kind of a funk. I feel like I just spent a torrid weekend with someone like, I don't know, Rachel Weisz or Dita Von Teese, and now she's kicked me to the curb and I fear I may never feel that kind of passion again. . . .


David Cranmer said...

G.B., I have many friends who are romance authors and there are many fine traits to learn from the genre and style. Take those tools and incorporate them into your own work. (Geez, did I just give advice?! *Slaps face*)

Randy, You are a one man tango when it comes to reading.

Chris, I just checked out the plot of EVIDENCE on Wikipedia. I like the amoral approach of the protagonist. Yeah, I would definitely read this and, of course, Banville has one or been nominated for just about every award. One of the big talents.




Kirsten said...

I just read my first contemporary YA. Left me cool. But what's weird is that it's well-done technically -- the writer was doing all the "right" things. So I'm now struck by the thought: can novels be so "well-done technically" that they're empty?

Rising to the top of my TBR is Monster Hunter International by Larry Correia -- April book on a Goodreads group I've joined. I'm kind of excited about this one :-)

David Cranmer said...

Kirsten, Yes to "well-done technically" and cold as a dead mackerel. Quite often (but not always) it is someone that has been to one too many writing classes.

Charles Gramlich said...

Rick hautala's short story collection, The Storm by Ty, Drifter detective, several others are in the bullpen. I'm finishing a David Drake Hammer's Slammers book and Lonclaws.

Scott Parker said...

Leviathan Wakes by James Corey
Ice rigger by Alan Dean Foster
Doc Savage on Skull Island (I.e., King King)
Action Comics by Grant Morrison

David Cranmer said...

Gentlemen, All kinds of titles I just wrote down for future purchasing. All new to me except Doc Savage.

pattinase (abbott) said...

Thank you so much, David. Your words rank awfully high with me.

Ron Scheer said...

I try not to spread myself too thin. Just finishing a loooong early western set in Alaska, Rob Dunn's THE YOUNGEST WORLD. It has taken me 2 weeks of dedicated reading. At bedtime, it's John Nesbitt's poetry collection, THORNS ON THE ROSE, and a 1946 antho of Black Mask stories, HARD-BOILED OMNIBUS.

Coming up: Tom RIzzo's LAST STAND AT BITTER CREEK, HOME INVASION and THE DRIFTER DETECTIVE.

David Cranmer said...

Ron, I'm hearing so much positive feedback on John Nesbitt's poetry collection. It's in my TBR but may have to move it up on the ladder.