Saturday, January 8, 2011

The Picture of Dorian Gray

"The sitter is merely the accident, the occasion. It is not he who is revealed by the painter; it is rather the painter who, on the coloured canvas, reveals himself. The reason I will not exhibit this picture is that I am afraid that I have shown in it the secret of my own soul."
-- from THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY by Oscar Wilde that first appeared in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890. Another classic I've never read and that I just downloaded from Project Gutenberg.

13 comments:

Deka Black said...

I never read it. But i hear years ago a wonderful audo drama version in the radio. Wonderful indeed.

Dan Fleming said...

Fantastic story.

Ron Scheer said...

Years since I've read it, but it's one of those that's beyond forgetting.

David Cranmer said...

Deka, I had seen the old 1940s film but that was it. I'm sure the radio version was terrific. I love radio.

Dan, So far Wilde's evocative descriptions are really something to behold.

Ron, That ending (if it is like the film) is indeed unforgettable.

David Barber said...

Hi David. What a great site that is. I'm being a bit of a hypocrite as I've not said too many good things abour e-books and the e-readers. But, I've checked it out and you can actually download audio versions of the books. I've been looking at getting some audio books for my iPhone for work. Better than listening to the mundaneness of the radio crackling because of a crappy signal and the droning of dance music that the young builders listen to!! (I'm getting old)

Thanks, David.

P.s. I'll be making a donation to them.

David Barber said...

Update - I've just downloaded the audio of Washington Irving's Sleepy Hollow. Fantastic. One complete file. Will get round to Dorian Gray, but I downloaded Sherlock Holmes [Adventures Of] and it sounds like it's being read by Stephen Hawkings. Couldn't listen to that!!

David Cranmer said...

Listening to Stephen H reading may take a half a lifetime!

I think the folks at PG are doing a worthwhile job. I mean the books are in the public domain and they’re only asking for contributions as opposed to some publishers that just snag these free classics and repackage them for ridiculous amounts of money.

Paul D. Brazill said...

It's the book that I've read most. And what does that say about me?!

Leah J. Utas said...

It's a great story, David. I only got around to reading it a year or so ago.

Oscar said...

Haven't read the book, but thought the ending of the movie was scary at the time I saw it.

David Cranmer said...

Paul, Thus far I'd say you have exquisite tatse, sir.

Leah, I promised myself after having not read Huck Finn (but being corrupted by the countless films) that 2011 was the year of the classics for me.

Oscar, Now that may be an old film to watch again. Hurd Hatfield turned in one of the iconic performances of the twentieth century.

Charles Gramlich said...

I just recently listened to this on my kindle and loved it. I'm sorry I waited so long to get to it. Great story.

David Cranmer said...

Charles, I'm listening as well. I love that feature.