Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Phone Booth

This post is for Clark more than anybody else. I had stopped at a convenience store in Fort Indiantown Gap, Pennsylvania last week and snapped this pic. Seriously, how often do you see a phone booth these days?

I was about to post this, decided to check Google, and spotted someone else thinking pretty much the same.

3/10 When One Thing Leads To Another: Patti left a comment that made me curious about the Fort Indiantown Gap, so I did another search finding this buried nugget:
An infamous 19th-century murder in Fort Indiantown Gap resulted in a trial of six defendants who all had blue eyes. They became known as the Blue Eyed Six, given the moniker by a newspaper reporter who was attending the trial. Their murder trial, held in the county courthouse in Lebanon, received worldwide publicity and inspired Arthur Conan Doyle while he was writing "The Red-Headed League".

20 comments:

Barbara Martin said...

They are necessary for those whose cell phone batteries decide to die at the wrong moment. I suspect there are some people who do not subscribe to the use of cell phones in this day and age.

Phone booths remind me of ten cent calls once upon a time.

Anonymous said...

I could never figure out what possessed him to change in a freaking phone booth to begin with?

James

sam said...

I haven't really paid attention to it but now I will be on the lookout for phone booths.

G said...

Wow, a phone booth...with working phones yet.

What will they think of next?

David Cranmer said...

Barbara, Along some long stretches of rural highways on the East coast, we have call boxes. I'm not too confident if I correctly remember ten cent calls, but definitely a quarter.

Anonymous, The simpler times,for sure. But undeniably classic.

Sam, Report all findings to the Fortress of Solitude.

G, Rotary phones for home use.

sandra seamans said...

I remember the ten cent calls! Every girl I knew carried a dime for emergencies. We have a few pay phones in our area but that's because the service is spotty here in the mountains.

Of course the best signal to be found around here is right in front of my house. I get at least one or more cars a day stopped at the end of my driveway talking on the phone!

Dave King said...

They're becoming a pretty rare sight here. Two together... wow!

pattinase (abbott) said...

And two of them in a town that is probably quite small.

David Cranmer said...

Sandra, I kinda remember (Little d says she does) the dime calls. It's like the fifty cent sodas and I'm a-betting there's some folks remembering being a Pepper for a lot less then that also. Btw you should think about charging for the parking. Throw up a sign and the works.

Dave, Lots of soldiers in the area, so that's probably why the booths continues.

Patti, a small but very scenic stop.

Leah J. Utas said...

Good to see them.

Scott Parker said...

Remember that funny scene in the first Superman movie (1978) where Lois is hanging from the helicopter and Clark takes a look at the then phone booth (the kind you don't step into) and shakes his head? Funny! And a nod to how far the phone booth had come from the 1930s to the 1970s.

David Cranmer said...

Leah, They're from another time. Making a stand.

Scott, Still the best Superman flick and that scene was so on the spot perfection.

I hear they are going to reboot the franchise yet again.

Sarah Laurence said...

Phone booths! They’re like buses: none when you need one and then 2 in a row. I wonder how Superman manages these days.

I’m seeing below that you took the Kindle plunge. I’m curious to hear your review.

G said...

I think I remember seeing one of those some time ago.

About the same time they were still manufacturing regular leaded gasoline.

In all seriousness though, my late next door neighbor had one those olf fashioned switchboards from the turn of the century in their basement. With all the works (mouthpiece, plug-ins and the like).

And yes, I do remember the 10 cent phone call, the 15 cent phone call, the 25 cent phone call, the 35 cent phone call (seeing a pattern here) and the fifty cent phone call.

And one more thing about rotaries: In some parts of our capitol and the major cities in our state, certain places that had high drug trafficking had their push button phones replaced with rotaries.

Clare2e said...

I remember my parents gave me a special card that held one shiny dime for emergencies. Then, it was upgraded to a quarter. By the time I needed 35-50 cents, I had a cell phone, which I now use little enough it could be behind emergency glass, too. Neat photo though!

The Blue Eyed Six, huh? Those were the good old days, back when they didn't name every crime something-Gate.

David Cranmer said...

Sarah, I'm still testing the device and gathering thoughts. So far positive, but will drop a post one of these days.

G, I had forgotten about rotaries in connections to the drug trade. I found this article, though it's pretty old: http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19900410&id=Rd4VAAAAIBAJ&sjid=sRIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=5012,2703403

Clare, Astute catch. We went from #s to Gates in labeling our less than admirable moments as a nation.

Randy Johnson said...

If I remember correctly, when they came up with "phone booth" gag, the booths were made of wood, ala doctor Who. Glass walls came along much later.

Alyssa Goodnight said...

Imagine having to write Fort Indiantown Gap on all those documents that require an address...

David Cranmer said...

Randy, Wood phone booths makes more sense for Clark to duck into to transform. I'll have to check a few old comics from the forties to see.

Alyssa, You ain't a-kidding. Carpal Tunnel for sure.

David Cranmer said...

Here's a shot of Superman with a wooden booth and glass.

http://truthpraiseandhelp.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/superman-phone-booth.jpg